Broad-leaved Peavine

Broad-leaved Peavine

Lathyrus latifolius

2017-07-04-09.23.079-smallest

Status in Squamish:

ERADICATE

Status in Whistler:

PREVENTION-WATCHLIST

Status in Pemberton:

ERADICATE
Vectors of Spread
Synonyms
  • Everlasting Peavine
  • Everlasting Pea
  • Perennial Peavine
ID Characteristics

General: Broad-leaved Peavine is a trailing or climbing perennial.

Flowers: Are pea-like, in shades of white, pink or red. Flowers form in clusters of 5 – 15 and are unscented.

Stem: Hairless with broad wings; stems can grow between 1 – 2 m long. Stems climb by using tendrils (if there is support) or form a dense mat of vegetation near the ground.

Leaves: Are blue-green and oval shaped. Leaves grow in pairs with branched tendrils between leaves. Each leaf is smooth and about 7 cm long and 2.5 cm across.

Roots: Broad-leaved Peavine has deeply-rooted rhizomes.

Fruits and Seeds: Seeds are found within pea-like pods, which are 7 – 9 cm long. These pods are first green and then turn black or dark grey as they mature and dry. Seeds are small, hard and round.

Similar Species
  • Invasive:

flat pea; narrow-leaved everlasting peavine

Flat Pea (Lathyrus sylvestris): This invasive is from the same family as Flat Pea; the two species are often confused for one another. Flat Pea pods and leaves are smaller.

You can learn more about the similarities and differences of Broad-leaved Peavine and Flat Pea in this comparison factsheet.

Habitat and Origin

Origin: Native to Europe, Broad-leaved Peavine was originally brought to North America as a garden ornamental for its showy flowers. It was also introduced as a means of erosion control.

Habitat: Typically found growing along roadsides or in disturbed areas where it can outcompete other species. Broad-leaved Peavine requires partial or full sun to grow, and prefers relatively dry soils.

Current Distribution

Broadleaved Peavine Distribution Map

Propagation & Vectors of Spread

Broad-leaved Peavine reproduces mainly by rhizomes, with its horizontal roots forming buds and growing new plants. It dies back during the winter and re-grows from deep roots in the spring.

Broad-leaved Peavine can also reproduce by seed. When mature, seed pods dry and twist to launch seeds up to 9 m away.

This plant is also sometimes planted as a garden ornamental, or can be present in seed mixes, which aid in its spread.

Ecological and Health Impacts

Health:

  • Fruits and leaves contain toxic compounds, and if eaten in large quantities these compounds can cause lathyrism, a serious disease. Humans, horses, and other animals with a single stomach are more susceptible.

Ecological:

  • Grows to form dense patches that outcompete all over low-growing native vegetation.
What Can I Do?

Broad-leaved Peavine is found in parts of Squamish and Pemberton, but not yet in Whistler, so PREVENTION of further spread and STRATEGIC CONTROL are key.

Learn to identify Broad-leaved Peavine: use the images presented in this profile page to learn how to identify this plant.

What to do if you spot Broad-leaved Peavine: You can report any sighting by clicking here.

 

DO:

  • Regularly monitor properties for infestations.
  • Avoid planting Broad-leaved Peavine
  • Ensure soil and gravel are uncontaminated before transport
  • Remove plant material from any equipment, vehicles, or clothing used in infested areas and wash equipment and vehicles at designated cleaning sites before leaving these areas.
  • Minimize soil disturbances (e.g. use grazing plans that prevent soil exposure from overgrazing), and use seed mixes with dense, early colonization (e.g. alfalfa or barley) to re-vegetate exposed soil and resist invasion.
  • Ensure plants (particularly seed pods or root fragments) are bagged or covered to prevent spread during transport to designated disposal sites (e.g. landfill).

DO NOT:

  • Don’t unload, park, or store equipment or vehicles in infested areas; remove plant material from any equipment, vehicles, or clothing used in such areas, and wash equipment and vehicles before leaving infested areas.
  • Do not plant Broad-leaved Peavine, no matter how well-contained the area might seem.
  • DO NOT COMPOST!

 

Control

Mechanical

  • Hand-pulling or cutting stems is a temporary control method, since plants re-grow from any remaining roots.
  • This regrowth can be hindered by covering the site and surrounding ground with woven plastic fabrics or other materials. This covering must be kept on for a minimum of 2 years, and the location monitored. Note: this method may also stop growth of other nearby plants, which may not be ideal.

Chemical

  • Translocated and selective herbicides (for broad-leaved plants) can be effective on Broad-leaved Peavine, such as triclopyr and dicamba.
  • Picloram is also effective, however it is not suitable for wet, coastal soil.
  • Treat areas should not be disturbed until the herbicide has had the chance to work (2 – 3 weeks).
  • New vegetation must be established following effective chemical treatment.
  • We recommend that any herbicide application is carried out by a person holding a valid BC Pesticide Applicator Certificate. Before selecting and applying herbicides, you must review and follow herbicide labels and application rates; municipal, regional, provincial and federal laws and regulations; species-specific treatment recommendations, and site-specific goals and objectives.

Cultural

Goats have been known to graze on Broad-leaved Peavine.

Biological

There is currently no biocontrol agent for this plant.

Report

Please report any sighting of Broad-leaved Peavine by clicking here.

References

Consortium of Wisconsin Herbaria, Lathyrus latifolius, http://wisflora.herbarium.wisc.edu/taxa/index.php?taxon=4017

Electronic Atlas of the Flora of British Columbia, Lathyrus latifolius, http://linnet.geog.ubc.ca/Atlas/Atlas.aspx?sciname=Lathyrus%20latifolius

Jefferson County Noxious Weed Control Board, Best Management Practices for Everlasting Peavine (Lathyrus latifolius) and Flat Pea (Lathyrus sylvestris), https://www.co.jefferson.wa.us/DocumentCenter/View/2957/Peavine

Jepson Herbarium at UC Berkeley, Lathyrus latifolius, http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/eflora/eflora_display.php?tid=30318

New York Flora Atlas, Lathyrus latifolius, http://newyork.plantatlas.usf.edu/plant.aspx?id=6548

Oregon Department of Agriculture Noxious Weed Control Program, Perennial Peavine (Lathyrus latifolius) Factsheet, https://www.oregon.gov/ODA/shared/Documents/Publications/Weeds/PerennialPeavineProfile.pdf

Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board, Perennial Peavine, https://www.nwcb.wa.gov/weeds/perennial-peavine

University of Michigan Herbarium, Lathyrus latifolius, https://michiganflora.net/species.aspx?id=1308

US Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, Lathyrus latifolius, https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=LALA4

Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board, Perennial Peavine, https://www.nwcb.wa.gov/weeds/perennial-peavine